July 1st, 2019

солнце

Ясновельможный, ваша светлость, ваше сиятельство, светлейший, сирена, HSH, Мелузина, Радзивиллы

serene (adj.)/sɪˈriːn/ (сирИн)
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mid-15c., "clear, calm," from Latin serenus "peaceful, calm, clear, unclouded" (of weather), figuratively "cheerful, glad, tranquil," from Proto-Italic *(k)sero- "dry," from PIE root *ksero- "dry," source also of Greek xeros "dry, arid" (see xerasia). In English, applied to persons since 1630s. Related: Serenely

His/Her Serene Highness (abbreviation: HSH, oral address: Your Serene Highness) is a style used today by the reigning families of Liechtenstein, Monaco, and Thailand. Until 1918, it was also associated with the princely titles of members of some German ruling and mediatised dynasties and with a few princely but non-ruling families. It was also the form of address used for cadet members of the dynasties of France, Italy, Russia and Ernestine Saxony, under their monarchies. Additionally, the treatment was granted for some, but not all, princely yet non-reigning families of Bohemia, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania and Russia by emperors or popes. In a handful of rare cases, it was employed by non-royal rulers in viceregal or even republican contexts.

In a number of older English dictionaries, serene as used in this context means
supreme;
royal;
august;
marked by majestic dignity or grandeur;
or high or supremely dignified.




sire  /sʌɪə/ сАйэ
noun
1.
the male parent of an animal, especially a stallion or bull kept for breeding.
"the sire is one of the country's top thoroughbred stallions"
2.
ARCHAIC
a respectful form of address for someone of high social status, especially a king.
verb

siren (n.) /ˈsʌɪr(ə)n/  сАйрэн



mid-14c., "sea nymph who by her singing lures sailors to their destruction," from Old French sereine (12c., Modern French sirène) and directly from Latin Siren (Late Latin Sirena), from Greek Seiren ["Odyssey," xii.39 ff.], one of the Seirenes, mythical sisters who enticed sailors to their deaths with their songs, also in Greek "a deceitful woman," perhaps literally "binder, entangler," from seira "cord, rope."




родоначальницa дома Лузиньянов
Melusinediscovered

дом Лузиньянов
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